Thursday, June 12, 2014

Pediatric Endoscopy Results

 
This blog post is the third and final post in a series concerning our personal experiences with a medical procedure, called a pediatric endoscopy. Please note:  I am not a medical professional. I am the parent of a micro-preemie who has experienced an endoscopy and I am sharing this story for informational purposes only. Please contact your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns about your child's health or nutrition.

If you have been reading my three-part series concerning my personal experiences with a pediatric endoscopy, you are probably curious about Emily's biopsies and pathology results.

I have good news and bad news to share. The good news is that we are beginning to get answers to our many questions about Emily's low-volume eating. The bad news is that Emily has reflux in her esophagus and upper stomach. I have not yet received a copy of the pathology report, so I am unable to share the severity of the reflux at this time.

As a result of the reflux diagnosis, Emily has been prescribed a new medication. We are hoping that the new prescription helps with the reflux and makes Emily feel well enough to eat an appropriate amount of food and, in turn, an appropriate number of calories.

The pediatric gastroenterologist initially prescribed the reflux medication in capsule form. It must be given to Emily 15 minutes to one hour before her first meal. Since the medication is in pill form, Craig and I had to open the capsule and pour its pebble-like contents into apple sauce for Emily. As you can imagine, this apple sauce concoction didn't go over very well.  
 

Getting Emily to eat bitter-tasting pebbles hidden in apple sauce was virtually impossible and created a bad eating experience at the start of the day. After a few days, I called the pediatric gastroenterologist and asked if there was an alternative to the capsule, such as a liquid. Luckily, the medicine could be compounded and be made into a liquid. 

We found a special compounding pharmacy and had the drug made into a liquid. The cost increased, but the liquid medication was well worth the price. We now administer the drug to Emily via syringe. Although she still resists, it's much easier to get her to consume the liquid form of the drug than the capsule's pebble-like contents. 
 

Emily will follow-up with the pediatric gastroenterologist and next steps will be determined at that time. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that she won't need any additional medical procedures. Please cross your fingers too!

If you missed my previous blog posts concerning our experiences with a pediatric endoscopy, please visit the links below:

 









11 comments:

  1. Sweet little Emily. I am thankful that you have found out what is wrong versus not knowing. Good job on figuring out how to give her the medication. Hopefully from here on out things will start to improve.

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    1. Mama's Happy Hive -- Thank you so much for your positive note! Although I hated having too put my baby through an endoscopy, I'm glad we did it to get some answers!

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  2. You have to be somewhat relieved to know whats wrong ...it's horrible as a mother not knowing whats wrong with your child! My son took medication for his reflux after we took him and always had trouble getting him to take it! I hope you see results fast and improvement!

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    1. Hi, Jackie! Thanks so much for your note. Yes -- it IS comforting to finally get some answers concerning Emily's health and nutrition. Thank you also for sharing your son's story with me. I hope your son is doing well!e is well!

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  3. I am so glad that you have some answers!

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    1. Thank you. mommy2apirateandprincess. It is nice to have answers, so that we can start an appropriate treatment plan with our doctors!

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  4. So glad you've got answers and direction. Our daughter is on the same liquid, compound medicine. It DOES get easier to administer. My DD has been taking it since about 3 weeks old, and for the last few months she's sucked the medicine out of the syringe :) Hopefully the medicine helps - it has definitely helped with us!

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    1. Thank you for your kind note, ktcupoftea. Although I do not wish reflux on anyone, I appreciate your personal story and find some comfort knowing someone else who has gone through a similar experience with their child. Unfortunately, this is not the first reflux drug that Emily has taken. She tried three different types of medications up until November, when she was 10 months (7 months adjusted). Everyone (including us) had thought that she had "grown out" of the reflux at that time. I hope this new liquid drug works for us -- just like it works for your daughter. It's amazing that your daughter actually sucks the medicine out of the syringe! Out of curiosity, how do you handle middle of the night and early morning feedings? Emily woke up at 4 a.m. this morning -- obviously hungry, but I had to administer the reflux drug before giving her formula. Since she is a low-volume eater, she was simply was unable to wait the minimum 15-minute requirement before eating her first meal of the day. I hope the drug still works when you simply are unable to wait 15 minutes to an hour before having your first bottle of formula. Thanks again for sharing your success story with me! It brings me hope!

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    2. Elizabeth hasn't woken up for middle of the night feedings for a while, BUT we may have a different type of reflux medicine than you do. We give her 1.7mL twice a day, and don't have the 15 minute wait requirement (at least no one told us we had to wait!). But we went through a phase too where we thought she had grown out of the reflux, backed the medication off, then regretted it!

      I can imagine a hungry baby doesn't want to wait those 15 minutes!! How did she handle the food this morning without waiting the 15 minutes? I hope she did fine! The compound medicine my DD is on builds up in her system over time, so missing the timing on one application won't affect much. Hopefully that will be the case for you!

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  5. I'm glad to hear that you're making progress now. It can be difficult to hide medicine in a kid's food, depending on the medicine. When my daughter needs antibiotics for an infection or whatever, I usually get the liquid form and mix a dose in a serving of yogurt.

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  6. I have found that a lot of the kids I've worked with can handle the capsules (opened and put in yogurt or apple sauce) when they get to about preschool age, but I've had good luck with jam at younger ages! Awesome that you have a local pharmacy that can help make it more palatable :) Best of luck to Emily.

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